People have been arguing that millennials don’t care about old classic movies. Maybe that’s true, or maybe it isn’t, everyone has their own taste when it comes to movies or TV series. But the fact remains that many people disregard classic cinema on principle. These people are actually missing out, because it only takes one film — the right film — to change their minds and alter their viewing habits altogether. And that right movie is “12 ANGRY MEN”

Cast and Crew

The movie stars… well 12 men as the name suggested with Martin Henry Balsam, John Donald Fiedler, Lee J. Cobb, E. G. Marshall, Jack Klugman, Edward Binns, Jack Warden, Henry Fonda, Joseph Sweeney, Ed Begley, George Voskovec, and Robert Webber.

The cast also includes Rudy Bond (Judge), Tom Gormon as the Sternographer, James Kelly, Billy Nelson, John Savoca and Walter Socker. The movie is directed by Sidney Lumet, Produced by Henry Fonda (The juror in the movie) and Reginald Rose, who is also the writer of the story.

Plot

Sidney Lumet’s 1957 courtroom drama follows 12, white, middle-aged, middle-class men as they deliberate on a seemingly open-and-shut murder case. Set almost entirely in a very small rather claustrophobic room of the overheated jury room of the New York County Courthouse, a jury prepares to deliberate the case of an 18-year-old Puerto Rican impoverished young man accused of stabbing his father to death. The judge instructs them that if there is any reasonable doubt, the jurors are to return a verdict of not guilty; if found guilty, the defendant will receive a death sentence. The film dives into the 12 men’s, and by extension society’s, deep-rooted prejudices, biases, fears and differences as they struggle to come to a unanimous decision/verdict.

The film dazzles the crowd from the start. Every one of the twelve jurors is acquainted with us as they are acquainted with themselves. The characters are well drawn out as individuals, each sparkling in his own character. The storyline gives out a meticulous summation of an Agatha Christie thriller.

From the start, the proof appears to be persuading, the neighbors affirm the respondent stab his dad from her window, and other affirmed that he heard the defendant threatening to murder his dad and the dad’s body hitting the ground, and afterward, through his peephole, saw him run past his entryway. The kid had brutal past and had also bought a switchblade. That was found at the murder site. But the defendant asserted that he has lost that blade. The knife was also found at the scene had been cleaned of fingerprints.

The tensity of the characters snare the crowd in from the starting. All through the film it was felt that the case is open and shut, 11 juror saying liable and 1 not. The distress of Henry Fonda as other members of the jury taunts him that how he can even observe anything sensible for this situation.

However, it was felt the excitement as he continues to disprove or add uncertainty to the contentions for liable and become spellbound and began to see doubts as different jury members.  

The film additionally shows the contentions for guilty and wonder if Juror Fonda is right with his doubts. However they additionally feel the disgrace of the characters as he falsify that a formerly sound theory is iron-tight, joining his side as individuals from the jury do.

One of the most noticeable components of the film is magnificently woven in misguided judgments as a human that impact individuals, and turns into the reason of tension between the characters. This was incredibly depicted by the actors. The performances by Fonda, Lee J Cobb and Joseph Sweeney were moving and outstanding.

The concept of misconceptions

For a movie based upon courtroom around a murder trial, the film has no action at all. The contentions play around confusions and the idea of justice which throughout looked extremely simple yet with one vote changed things around. The entire film felt grasping. One of the most complimenting parts of 12 Angry Men is the cinematography. The vast majority of the film’s part was taken shots at eye-level with no charm into it, gives a fantasy of situations getting developed progressively, making a feeling of distress, not with the film, but rather with how the final decision will go!

This movie is your definite watch for this weekend!


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